Most Popular Posts

Monday, July 22, 2013

10 Surprising Things about Parenting in Japan

For our Motherhood Around the World series, our second interview features photographer Yoko Inoue, who moved from Brooklyn to the Japanese countryside with her husband and son. Here are 10 things that have surprised her about being a mom in Japan...

Yoko's background:

Photographer Yoko Inoue grew up in the suburbs of Japan and moved to New York when she was 21. “I always felt like I was born in the wrong country,” she says. “People in Japan like to be the same. There’s a lot of pressure to fit in. But I always wanted to be different. In New York, I felt at home. You have to be different. Everyone is trying to stand out.”

But in 2010, after seventeen years in New York, her American husband suggested they move to Japan for a few years with their young son Motoki, and Yoko agreed. “New York gets tiring. When we went home to visit my parents in the countryside, we always had a great time. I wanted my son to be able to speak Japanese and learn Japanese culture.” So, they moved to a rural neighborhood, close to both mountains and a river, which is about 15 minutes from the medium-sized city of Okayama.

When they first moved back, she was in heaven: “The food is good; the people are so nice; the pace is slow. I thought, this is amazing!” Having lived in Japan now for over three years, she’s started to experience some of the challenges, as well. “It’s very different to be a mom here—in some hard ways,” she says. “There’s so much pressure to fit in, versus being an individual. But, on the flip side, the close community provides so much safety. Motoki can go outside and play and I don’t have to watch him. He can trust people, whereas in New York he had to learn from an early age to doubt. Here, everyone is family, and everyone is aware of him.”
On pregnancy: I’m six and a half months pregnant right now and have been going to a Japanese doctor. In New York, when I was pregnant with Motoki, my doctor warned me, "You can’t eat sushi, coffee, alcohol or raw cheese." She gave me special vitamins. My Japanese doctor says nothing about any of that! No diet restrictions at all. I did pick up flyer at the doctor’s office that said I can drink a few cups of coffee a day and a glass of alcohol.
On making friends: Most of the moms I’ve met here are full-time homemakers. In New York, most women I knew worked and had careers before and after they got married and had kids. I still work full-time as a photographer, so I find it’s hard to relate to the moms here sometimes...it’s hard to make a friend.

It has taken me a few years to learn that Japanese moms communicate differently than Brooklyn moms. In Brooklyn, you would meet a mom on the playground and tell her everything about what is going on in your house—problems with your husband or kids. You could be very open. It made me feel like, "I’m not alone—everyone is going through similar things." Here, if I am open, I get strange looks. It’s easy to feel like you are the only one having problems. But really, everyone is going through similar things—they just don’t share it in the same way. People really draw a line between public and private.

On parties: When we go to a get-together with other families, men and women are totally separate. The women are usually in the kitchen cooking food and watching the kids, and the men are in another room drinking beer. I don’t understand this…I want to be sitting and drinking! In Brooklyn, we were always mixed, mothers and fathers. Moms don’t seem to make friends with other fathers here.

On date night: Date night is not a thing here. I once told some friends I had hired a babysitter to go out to dinner with my husband, and they were shocked. Restaurants are very expensive, and men tend to work very late—even on weekends—so it’s very rare to eat out...maybe just once a year. On your birthday. Sometimes I feel like once a Japanese woman marries, she just becomes ‘mother’—not woman or wife. She and her husband lead separate lives. She eats early, with the children, and he eats late, often with his business associates. Couples still seem happy and friendly with each other, but it’s a man’s world inside of marriage. Men don’t help with housework.
On nursery school: There are two kinds of nursery school in Japan: one for kids whose moms work, and one for kids whose moms stay home. The one for working moms runs six days a week, from 7am until 6pm, and your child can’t go unless you prove you have a job or can’t take care of him for some reason. I sent my son to the "working mom" school, and it was wonderful. It’s supported by the government so it only costs about $150 per month (including a balanced lunch prepared by a chef in their own school kitchen). It’s mostly about being outside, touching bugs, building in the sand. The philosophy is "learn by playing." The other school goes just until lunch and it’s more academic and structured and focused on teaching in a classroom.
On kindergarten: Motoki just ended his "preschool" and started the Japanese version of kindergarten. Here are photos of his preschool graduation and his "opening ceremony" for kindergarten. The year changes over in March, and you go right from one grade to another, so there's no summer break.
On walking to school: All the kids in our town meet in the road and walk to school together...as young as seven. The elder people in the neighborhood volunteer to make sure the kids safely cross the roads. They are so happy to help and to do the "exchange of greetings" with the children. As parents we have to make sure our kids always say greetings "with big voice! Good morning!" (No mumbling or looking down.) If you don’t, it’s considered so rude! Parents also take turns watching the kids walk to school to make sure they do the greetings and stay safe. The parent who is watching takes notes in a community record book—things like "Junior high school kids were riding their bikes dangerously fast!" or "Steps are wobbly and should be fixed for kids’ safety." Then these problems are discussed at the next PTA meeting.
On food: Kids here eat mostly very healthy…tons of rice! Lunch boxes are mainly rice balls—sometimes wrapped in seaweed—with a little egg omelet, sausage and broccoli. The tricky part is that there isn’t labeling like in the U.S. So when you buy eggs or vegetables, you don’t know if they’re organic or not. My husband thinks it’s because all the food is good quality, but it frustrates me not to know. In Brooklyn I was part of a food coop and I bought all organic...Here I just have to close my eyes and buy it!
On community: Community is everything here. The town holds lots of events, and everyone goes. Once a month everyone gets together to clean the neighborhood and local Buddhist temple. When you’re out walking around you always have to "do greeting," which is a formal bow and hello. It’s so nice, but also sometimes I think, leave me alone! In New York I could be anonymous and never know my neighbors. Here, I might want to stay in with my family on a Sunday, but we have to go to a community festival. It’s very important to attend if you want your children to be accepted.

On modesty: Most department stores have separate "nursing rooms" so that mothers can breastfeed. The flip side is, I never see moms nursing in public. People are very modest. Women wear a lot of black and cover their arms and legs—even in the summer! They are always covering the shape of their bodies. In Brooklyn, I wouldn’t think twice about a woman walking down the street in a tank top and no bra. Here, a whole community of people would be shocked if I wore a tank top!
On the pace: No matter how much you make in New York, you always feel poor. School, rent, medical bills—everything is so expensive. In Japan, I found something I couldn't have bought with money: a feeling of safety—no pressure. Childcare and school are inexpensive, and healthcare is cheap as well. My husband and I joke sometimes that it’s like we’re living in a retirement community. You can just enjoy your time. It took me about a year to get used to not worrying about something constantly. I kept thinking, "Did I forget something?" Sometimes I feel like I’m not using my brain enough so I started learning French!
Thank you, Yoko! (And isn't her home, above, beautiful?)

P.S. 10 surprising things about being a mom in Norway, and why French kids eat everything. Yoko also spoke to our friends at Momfilter about her experience a few years ago.

(Thank you to my fantastic friend and writer Lina Perl for help reporting and interviewing)

189 comments:

cécile said...

oh my god...so interesting!!!! i knew a few things about how traditional and old school life is in Japan...but i had never imagined it to be that backward...i mean men and women separated at parties, come on!
wow...fascinating.

Lena said...

I loved this! I met Yoko when she photographed our house for a book about Brooklyn homes. This is such a great series, Joanna.

Alexa said...

i am really enjoying this series! so interesting!

Lauren Ashley said...

So fascinating. I'm really loving this series!

mamalooks said...

I loved this, espacially the part about children walking to school with the support of volunteers.

Tuesday said...

Tiny ones peeling carrots is so awesome!

Rosie said...

Wow, this was fascinating! Absolutely LOVING this series, it's so interesting. It's easy to find information about different countries online, but this sort of insight is so unique. Brilliant! Can't wait for the next one!

www.ciderwithrosie.com

Emmy M. said...

So fascinating. I really like Yoko and her son's clothes! Interesting that her son's school there has something in common with the Norwegian school discussed last week- that the philosophy largely centers around playing outside.

Anne said...

Wow! This series is such a great idea, I'm really loving it!

Caley said...

no idea that Japanese culture was so patriarchal! truly fascinating!

Lynn said...

I'm loving this!!! So interesting and the moms are so insightful!

Pamela said...

really enjoyed this one ... nice to see variety in your moms (as in, not always euro moms)

loudfootsteps said...

Beautiful post, and lovely information!
It sounds like the community really focuses on the well being and growth of the children, this is so nice to hear.

Rebecca Manor said...

As an expectant first-time mom, I am loving this series. I spent the past five years living in Scotland and France and am now back in the US and am finding the transition challenging. Especially being pregnant! It seems like there are so many rules and methods surrounding pregnancy and parenting, it's refreshing to see how other cultures approach these seasons of life. And frankly, it's freeing. I think that there is a sort of cultural obsession in the US with doing everything "right" and it's so good to see that we do not have all the answers. Living abroad helped me see this and this series is reinforcing the fact that I can learn so much from other people and cultures. Thank you Joanna!

Kaylyn Marie said...

Thank you SO much for sharing these insights. How incredible that we can all learn something from other women and how everyone's culture shapes them in different ways. So very fascinating. Please keep them coming! :)

Marcouiller Trimble said...

i am really loving this series (i had sent in an "entry" when you first posted this idea) - i am an american mother in belgium with my husband from quebec and my 4 and a half year old twin boys. we are here for work (theater) and it is so different indeed. in reading the 2 posts in this series so far lots ring true. thanks for doing it.

WELCOME! said...

Absolutely amazing! I'm loving this series!

Nina Leung said...

This series is so fascinating. Thank you so much for doing it.

I'm travelling in Czech Republic and Slovakia right now and have thought so much about how different my 18 month old and 4 year old are to the other children we encounter. They're 10 times louder and wilder! I'm sure it's a parenting and cultural difference. This series is really helping me analyze that.

Thank you!

amy said...

I love this series; it's so interesting to be able see the differences in cultures from someone who's experienced it firsthand.
I'm Chinese and although I've lived in America my whole life, I can still relate to a few of these things.

Pooja said...

Can you talk more to being Asian American in Asia--of Japanese American in Japan as is in your case? What are the conflicts posed when your subculture clashes with the dominant culture?

ale norris said...

how interesting!! i've said this before but i absolutely love this series.

Mel said...

Another great post. Thank you.

Karen Travels said...

I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this series!! You could make it a book!

But oh my, am I envious about cheap daycare. I pay $230 a week.

Jennifer P. said...

This series is absolutely fantastic. Best idea ever.

Laura D said...

So interesting, thank you for sharing! It would be such a culture shock to move to a country where men and women are separated at parties, I don't think I could do it. But it's wonderful that there's a sense of community and safety. So interesting too, that Yoko is Asian-American and living in Japan--do people perceive her as Japanese or American?

greenmountainglobetrotter.blogspot.com

Amy said...

I am loving this serious so much!

I taught in Hokkaido for a year and I could not believe how patriarchal the culture still is. We tend to think of Japan as such an advanced country but in so many ways it really is not.

Ellie said...

OMG, Joanna I L-O-V-E this series. I'm years away from having kids, but this is just so fascinating! A coffee table book should follow, perhaps? (I want 5% for the idea haha.) I hope you and the family are well.

The izzle said...

A great series Joanna. Lately I have been wondering if I should have traveled more before having a family but this series allows me to share in the adventures of other mothers which I enjoy very much.

Jess Wilkins said...

I love this series! I just had my first child (she's 6 months) and I'm so intrigued by all this. I love your blog. Get some rest :)

Maureen Callahan said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Pamela said...

I'd love to hear more on this too!

Maureen Callahan said...

This series rocks! Could you also do one on dating in different countries? :)

NotesFromAbroad said...

This is so interesting ! I have to send it to my daughter in law and son. She is Japanese, living in NY now .. she just had a baby. She had lovely American non-Japanese doctors and due to her own research, ate nothing raw but she is a vegetarian so her natural diet was good.
She and the baby are perfect, we are a very lucky family.

simone antoniazzi said...

Me too!

I really love how she has been so objective & sensible in what she says, sounds like she is really able to appreciate the pros & cons of each culture. And clearly there are some really good things about being in Japan, hence why they moved there in the first place....the sense of community and advantages for her child being one of them. And the lack of stress....love how she describes the feeling of thinking that she was forgetting something all the time, city life is terribly fast, not always a good thing.

Jessie Bryson said...

I am absolutely LOVING this series - devouring every last word of the last two. I'm not even a mom, but it really strikes me - both as someone who's always been fascinated with sociology, as well as having to move around the world due to my husbands work. Can't wait for the next one!!!

cara said...

This series is so so interesting! I love the perspective it gives and I can't wait to read more in the coming weeks!!

laurenfoode.com said...

I'm sure pulling this series together was a ton of work, but it's quickly become my favorite part of your blog. If you'd ever consider continuing it full time (even once a month!) I know I speak for a lot of your readers when I say, I would love it!

Annie Reeves said...

This series is awesome!!!! Love reading something a little more cerebral/fascinating than the fashion blogs I follow. Thank you!!!

anniereeves.com

Christen Brackett said...

Just had to add my two cents, that I love these vignettes of motherhood around the world! I have always wondered... thanks!

collette said...

So interesting...I think I'd miss chatting with men as well. Once again, jealous of low cost health care and child care. Nice work ladies!

Shruti Kapoor said...

Beautiful post and so informative. I had no idea about raising kids in Japanese culture. Thank you for sharing it with us. I am curious to know if big cities like Tokyo have similar culture? Going from NYC to a completely rural neighborhood is a big adjustment, culturally and socially. Are most of Yoko's experiences so because she lives in the rural suburbs or it is culturally the same everywhere in Japan?
Maybe she would have experienced something diff. if she went from NYC - Tokyo. Found like minded moms?

Julie said...

Fascinating! I really enjoyed reading this. Thank you.

Erin said...

LOVE this series. Can you keep it going forever??? :)

merisamccollum said...

A really insightful article. Where I live, in a small town in West Texas, I consider it a micro culture of it's own. It's nice to hear what's going on around the world.

Sasha said...

Even though I do not have children, I'm getting a lot out of this series! By focusing on parenting, the articles really provide a snapshot on different cultural approaches to life in general.

The divide between women and men even at parties in Japan really surprised me, but those delicious, healthy lunches did not! I guess all cultures have their ups and downs and it is valuable for parents to be able to pick and choose between customs from various cultures (although I guess that fitting in could then be difficult).

Rony @ catbird said...

I love this series - totally fascinating and gives a really great perspective.

Simple-Savvy said...

Thanks for sharing! We live in the US but my son is 1/4 Japanese. It's interesting to see how they do it over there.

Vivian said...

Wow! I have been living in Japan for four years (both in rural Japan and Tokyo), and Yoko is so right about everything! It's interesting to read from her point of view especially, as she is Japanese but lived in America for so long- her insights are amazing and she describes things perfectly. It's difficult to fit in in Japan- whether as a foreigner or a Japanese who has lived abroad. I love also how she shared those nice details about children walking to school together as it's such a big part of Japanese daily life. Thanks, Yoko, I LOVED this post and your little boy is adorable! And I love Okayama :)

Philline Dilao said...

I'm from Japan, and I think Motoko's observation is pretty accurate--but in the context of a rural life. Things are much different in the big city life nowadays. Many women are now balancing career and family life, men are also helping out (even taking a Parental leave). The separation between men and women are not so "backward" as she says anymore (or maybe it's just me in what I see in the big cities like Tokyo and Kobe). Overall, an interesting read.

Denise Thomas said...

Awesome! This is a great series.
whereisjune.com

rosanne said...

This interview is very interesting and timely. I heard a report on NPR's Morning Edition last Friday that Japanese gov't officials are looking towards Robot Nannies as the child care of the future. The reporter also talked about the very patriarchal culture that has clearly defined roles for men and women - as Yoko mentioned here - where men work long hours and women are home makers and the two spheres don't mingle very much. Working women who become mothers are in essence structurally forced to be at home because of the limited day care options. It's interesting because as an technologically advanced nation, there are so many things that seem antiquated relative to the US. There are advantages and trade-offs everywhere you go.

As a working mother, I don't think that we have it all figured out in the US. My husband is from eastern Europe and we have bandied the idea of moving to his home city but am hesitant since I haven't really been able to talk to someone who might share my perspective. I really love this series, Jo! Can't wait for the next one.

abroadathome said...

Echoing everyone else, this series is SO great. I love it! I am moving to Switzerland for a few years with my husband, and although we don't have kids right now we have talked about starting a family while there. I imagine that raising a family in Europe would be quite different than here in the States. I actually look forward to it given the amount of opinions in US culture regarding pregnancy dos and don'ts.

Already looking forward to the next installment!

xo Kristina

Joselle Palacios said...

This series should be a regular feature! It's great to see how mothering works and doesn't work elsewhere. No place is perfect and there's lots to learn and perhaps borrow from. Love this! http://exileinmomville.blogspot.com

April in Autumn said...

I am not a mom and I love reading this. It's so interesting to see what life is like for women in different countries... and I'm sure it's different in a big city than it is in the country. We all live such interesting lives...

LSK said...

Nothing more to add, I LOVE this series! I agree that it should be a regular feature. I appreciate being reminded that no place is perfect to be a mother, but I have been inspired to take little tidbits of these countries and try to add them to my parenting. Thank you for such a refreshing and inspiring series!

Jammin Jessica said...

Wow this was a cool post to read. I can definitely relate to the culture differences being an Asian American myself. Also, that is one stylish kid.

Addie said...

This was really interesting, thanks!
My husband is Japanese, and would love to live in Japan again, but we are raising our son in the states. He will be a citizen of both countries until he is 20 years old when he will have to choose between the two because Japan does not allow dual citizenship after that. Even if you speak Japanese, living in Japan can be difficult for Westerners, especially women, which is why I don't want to move there. We hope to spend lots of summer/winter breaks there with his parents though :)

Michelle Panting said...

I'm so glad that you're doing this series Joanna, I LOVE this post. It's so great that these mom's are willing to share the bad as well as the good.

http://www.fullbellywornsoles.com

Ana said...

So so beautiful. I love to see this perspective of American mom's abroad. Its so interesting to me because we're all so different. Whenever I travel I always encounter a few differences when it comes to childcare, like how the Spanish bring their babies out for dinner at 10pm and don't think twice about it. Being there with my son who was 4months old and had a 6:30pm bed time was incredibly challenging, no restaurants were open at that time!

katie said...

This series is wonderful. I'm 32 weeks pregnant with my first, my husband is Danish, and I also spent some time in my 20s living in both Russia and Central Asia...so I've both seen and felt the role that culture plays in everything we do, especially on how we parent our children. Looking forward to reading more!

Erma B. said...

This was so eye-opening! I learned a lot about Japanese parenting and how it compares to life in an American city. I think it's funny that there are nursing rooms in department stores but she never sees anyone nursing in public!

I really love this series, Joanna.

First time homeowners said...

What a wonderful series! Thank you so much for exposing us to the facets of parenting in other cultures. There's so much to gain from learning and considering those habits and cultural norms we're accustomed to in our families. Looking forward to the next one!

kati said...

i love this series so, so much! so fascinating. some of this sounded so hard, but after that last paragraph about the pace, i just want to live there. i think it would do my heart good :)

Mai said...

This series is great - loving it!

zhuk77 said...

This series is an AHMAZING idea! You absolutely must speak to moms in Eastern Europe (primarily Russia). I am from there originally, and everything about the daily life to moral priorities and ethics is so different from what I have grown used to after immigrating to the US. If you don't know any Americans living there, I might try to get a hold of someone via my friends network. Please let me know, I am sure many people would be fascinated!

Heather Robinson said...

Just a little coucou from Arles, France to say that I am not a Mom and I love this series too. Oops, I see April above said the same. But I think it is a very positive thing to be doing. I know from my travels that the more that we all know about each other, the better the world works. Merci. :)

Sara said...

Thanks for this, very interesting. :)

Jasmin said...

Hi,

I live in Belgium (Antwerp). Being Belgian and having lived here all my life, I'm very curious to know what is so typical about our parenting style :) I have two sons myself. 1 and 3 years old.

lessthanperfectmama.com said...

Wow!!! When you're from NY, I think sometimes we forget that not every place is like ours. I do wish more people cared a teensy bit more what others think of them so we could all enjoy things like better manners (Hold the door please! or Please don't cough on me!). Life in Japan sounds lovely in a different way. I just don't know if I could deal with it! Great series. Love it.

Lauren @ Sassy Molassy said...

This is really interesting. Thanks for sharing her story.

Jasmin said...

A very interesting series. Looking forward to the next interview!

17 beats. said...

wonderful read ! so fascinating. far and away the best series you've done, Joanna. Brava.

Http://E-MyBook.Com said...

Congratulations! Very Good WebSite.


E-Books
.

Http://E-MyBook.Com said...

Congratulations! Very Good WebSite.


E-Books
.

jm said...

This is so fascinating! I am totally loving this series.

Patty said...

Great post! The house and the view are gorgeous!

jm said...

I love the schooling, healthcare and security, but would definitely not be able to handle the way men and women have such different roles and are kept separate such a large part of the time. Very interesting read.

Nicole Michelle Centers said...

I love this series!

Gorgeous photos :)

Nicole
www.eleganceandclutter.com

Lisamarie said...

I love love love this series!

And how can we see more of her home? It looks amazing!

grey-nyc said...

It would be interesting to hear what it's like for her son being half Japanese, especially given the pressure to fit in that she mentioned. Also has it been an adjustment for her husband, as a caucasian in Japan?

Kathryn Farwell said...

I don't usually leave comments, but I just want to say that I'm really enjoying this series! I'm not a mother yet, but I love reading about the various cultural differences/observations/challenges of living abroad and raising a family. Really well done :)

cortney said...

Joanna,
I am obsessed with this series! Thanks so much for sharing the lives of all these wonderful women! AMAZING!

Cortney

potatomom said...

I think without the cultural reference, the reader's can't help but take the gender role thing a little out of context. It' not that women are not allowed to sit with the men, it's that women are supposed to be preparing and doing housework (remember women don't work outside the home) and the separation happens more organically. Even here in NYC, it's often funny when you find how women/moms will end up in one end of the room and men/dads in the other (especially if there's sports on tv). It's just a more traditional (of course annoying and sexist) version of that. And I'm sure Yoko doesn't go join the men for a beer, because she's already different and doesn't want to stand out with everything she does. That's the part that's really annoying is that you don't necessarily do what you want, because you don't want more attention. Also as someone else noted, it's not really like this in the cities. Now you see tons of dads everywhere wearing baby carriers (more so than here).

Rebecca Thompson said...

I agree with Erin- This series is awesome, and I'm not even a mom!! I would be interested to see some remote locations as well :)

E. and Baby P. said...

so fascinating. i'm starting to see a theme here about individuality vs. conformity. part of me wants so badly to raise my kids abroad but some of the points she makes here is exactly the reason why i'm happy to be raising my kids here in the U.S. especially the aspect of individuality, critical thinking and well as having a strong connection to a place and culture.

princess butterfly said...

Loved reading this post. The cultural differences are interesting, even being an Asian American. I could only imagine living in Asia with children, but if given the opportunity, I would jump! I love that Yoko is giving her son a chance to know his Japanese heritage fully.

*** KITSCH *** said...

Very interesting!
I work in a japanese company, so i have knew some japanese woman.
They have very deep culture feeling.

Thanks for sharing!

Allison said...

love love love this! so fascinating

Jenna Lou said...

I LOVE this series so much!! Please keep them coming!

Taty said...

Nice! Oh and did you plan a playdate for your baby and Kate's new little prince :)
Keep the pictures coming!
love it!
xx

http://taty-in-newyork.blogspot.com

Danielle said...

Check out the article "The Never-Ending Family Sailing Trip" in Outside Magazine about a family with young children who travel around the world on a sailboat!

http://www.outsideonline.com/adventure-travel/active-family-guide/The-Never-Ending-Family-Sailing-Trip.html

Ana said...

This is an amazing new series. As an expat myself (not yet a Mom) this is definitely fascinating. Thank you!

Ana said...

This is an amazing new series. As an expat myself (not yet a Mom) this is definitely fascinating. Thank you!

Sophie said...

I'm also interested in the Belgian way of parenting, being a Belgian and living for 3 years in Switzerland with a 3 y-o boy and 3 m-o baby girl.
Japan has some points to share with Switzerland, re kids walking alone to school (in Switzerland, they have to do it since the 1st year of kindergarten, 4 y-o! at least in the villages), lots of mums-at-home and kindergarten only in the mornings...
Local moms are also discrete about their family life and it's not easy to connect (furthermore if you don't speak Swiss German). But when you meet an expat mom, that's true you can share in 5 minutes private stuffs about you pregnancy, your gynecologist, your labour, husband or kids!
Thanks for this series, Joanna.


Melissa Blake said...

It's so interesting to hear all the different experiences around the world. :)

Heidi said...

Thank you so much for this wonderful series. I am an Australian living in NY and raising two children; my sister and I often laugh at how different our parenting/living experiences are in two relatively similar countries.

Estee said...

LOVE this series. Ticks all the boxes-motherhood, life abroad, a look into other people's lives and culture. Thank you for sharing!

myheartscontentblog.com said...

I'm loving this series too - particularly because we (inc my 3 year old son) had the luck to spend 3 weeks in Japan last year and we fell madly in love with the place. SO interesting - and I love how both mums so far have been able to see both the positive AND the negative about their new homes. So balanced!

Risa said...

Amazing series of articles! One commenter referred to Japan as "backwards", and another commented on how it's not as advanced as she'd thought. While I agree that I would like to mingle with both mothers and fathers at a party, I think that this is simply a cultural difference. Japan sounds as though it's much more advanced than the US in most areas, when it comes to the organic way they approach education, the way they value good nutrition, and the importance they place on community.

Clara Artschwager said...

This is now the best part of my Monday, Joanna! Such incredible content. I'm absolutely fascinated by the way these different mother's live. I love the focus they place on healthy eating, education, and community. That said- it would totally be hard not to be able to "dish" at the playground- and I don't even have kids!

Jupiter said...

Two things: first, others' points about rural vs urban lifestyle are important to consider. I have lived in Japan in both rural and urban contexts and it varies as much as you might imagine it varying, say, in rural Kansas vs Boston.

Second, "backwards"/ "patriarchal" (see another post below) are not labels I would automatically slap on another culture without nuance. All female environments are more common in many other countries, and not necessarily less "feminist," just different. I am aware of the many challenges women face in Japan, but as a US citizen with a multicultural background I think that the challenges women face here are different -- if perhaps less legible according to a Western cultural perspective. So I'm sorry to see a certain amount of stereotyping going on in the responses to this post.

Betsy said...

What a cool series of blog posts! I really loved reading this. Bookmarking you now!

theycallmekatie said...

No date night? That was what made me the saddest about the post. So much of it I loved/envied, but she makes it sound like the romance get turned off once a wife becomes a mom.

aa31b8d4-3390-11e0-b088-000bcdcb471e said...

Backwards? Surely you know that your way of doing things/living is no more progressive [or any less backward, actually] than someone else's. Be careful with the language you use to describe cultures other than yours .... particularly, if all you know of it is what you've read/heard from someone else. It's an unfair, and often, inaccurate assessment to make.

Emma Finlayson said...

So interesting!


xo Emma
http://strollingthecityinheels.com
**Stella & Dot giveaway on the blog**

Kim said...

really enlightening. great post!

-kim
midnight snark

Jennifer of JennySue Makeup said...

This culture shock of differences she is experiencing is amazing!!! What a fabulous series to have started!! Can't wait to read more!!

CC said...

I can't wait for more posts in this series. I'm not a mother but I find them fascinating. This one made me a little sad though about the differences in roles that men and women play there. But I love their take on privacy. I definitely feel the U.S. has gotten into the realm of over sharing and complaining about the small things.

candidcerebrations.blogspot.com

Danielle Skye said...

This is the most fascinating blog series I have ever read - thankyou so much!

Roseann Bath Photography said...

This is such a fascinating series, Joanna. I am really enjoying it. Thank you!

Roseann

www.roseannbathphoto.com

Unknown said...

This is so interesting and timely for me! I have just finished reading "Bringing up Bebe" by Pamela Druckerman, about raising children as an American in Paris and I am a Brit living in Seattle. When i was in the UK I wasn't thinking about having children so I never paid attention to many of its aspects but now I'm starting to really notice them! Thanks you for this wonderful, insightful series!

Unknown said...

This is so interesting and timely for me! I have just finished reading "Bringing up Bebe" by Pamela Druckerman, about raising children as an American in Paris and I am a Brit living in Seattle. When i was in the UK I wasn't thinking about having children so I never paid attention to many of its aspects but now I'm starting to really notice them! Thanks you for this wonderful, insightful series!

the kimber said...

A lot of readers seem to be interested in Yoko's experience in Japan as an Asian American but, it sounds like Yoko is native Japanese, since she grew up in Japan until the age of 21 and is now returning with her husband and child. Having said that, her life experiences and background do give her authority to speak on the differences between American and Japanese culture and I loved her story. It would be great to see another post on Japan in the future, hearing about motherhood from a true "outsider's" perspective. Perhaps an American woman married to a Japanese man - similar to Rebecca's situation in Norway.

Seems like this series is a big hit, so I'm sure there will be a time and place for it. Keep 'em coming!

Mrunmayee said...

This series is wonderful! I am not married or a mom yet and I have lived all my life in India, in small towns and bigger forward cities.
I can find so many similarities between the Japanese culture in terms of men women being separate at parties and women being predominantly responsible for children and housework. It's the same thing here, but things are changing fast and as women work today these responsibilities are being shared too. Can't wait for the next post in the series...

Yumiko Tanno said...

This was very interesting to read, even for me, a working pregnant woman living in the middle of Tokyo, because life in Okayama sounds very different from life in Tokyo!

A lot of my Japanese friends who are moms work (there is a shortage of daycare so I was recommended to start looking once I hit my second trimester, and to apply to as many different pre-schools as possible), I've never been to a party where the men and women were separated, and date nights are very important for parents!
But there is not much sense of community- everyone is busy getting on with their lives.

Yoko's home is beautiful!

Lisa Parkar said...

Great post. One more great blog here with all of the valuable information in it. Keep up the good work of sharing blogs like this Italian leather modern living room set

Jess said...

This series is awesome, I just LOVE it! Also, on a side note, HOW AMAZING IS HER HOUSE!?? I think I want to move there!

Pooja Mittal said...

Hey nice post
Would you like to follow each other.. !!!
Keep in touch
www.beingbeautifulandpretty.com

OliviaP said...

I agree with people who are saying that some of your readers are taking things quite out of context with the parties comment-i lived in Japan when I was 15 (about 5 years ago) in a host families, and its not that men are super sexist or wont "let" you party with them, its more that, the women have women stuff to talk about, and men have men stuff. because their lives are so separate, there is a natural effect of like attracting like and two groups forming, Iithink. the men are very shy often, very culturally burdened with their role as "breadwinners", but in my experience, very kind people. The separation is because the parents spend almost no time together and marriages suffer, not because the men are not by and large lovely, kind compassionate people. I have never been in a country where I as a young, busty, blonde girl have been treated more respectfully by men and I come from one of the worlds most pro female equality countries. Please dont assume things out of context.

Danielle E. Alvarez said...

So interesting! Thanks for posting.

Lisa Parkar said...

interesting piece to read, giving every subject enlightenment modern dinette sets

Lisa Parkar said...

The post contains really precious information that will convince readers and can clarify things upon NYC Office Rental

OliviaP said...

also, please dont assume that school is super idyllic and chill beccause this wee one's kindy looks awesome. Its pretty ughhh in my first hand experience!

janis said...

i was curious about that too! i work at an international school in south korea. there are several students who are half korean at the school (half canadian/half korean and one student who is half korean/half jordanian). i've heard from their parents that it going to a korean school was very difficult for their children as they were often picked on and bullied. the international school environment has been a lot more open and accepting.

RR said...

Very interesting series, despite the comments getting caught up in generalities. There are so many ways to raise a child -- it is so pleasant to see many different perspectives. Keep them coming.

rk said...

Backwards?? I don't think so. Even in modern day New York City, the men often gather around the barbecue and women help each other in the kitchen. I also don't think American women make friends with other people's husband's as easily and commonly as we would pretend they do. We have plenty of the same boundaries here in America. We like to pretend that such boundaries don't exist or shouldn't exist... It's just a different way of life.

little t said...

So interesting... I love the walk to school concept. That's cool!

Melissa said...

This series is my favorite yet! Kuddos, Joanna!
Ten years ago, we were in Osaka, Japan for six weeks and I had the opportunity to meet and spend a significant amount of time with a wonderful group of Japanese moms. Some of us (and our children) still stay in touch to this day). So much of what Yoko shared is relevant even in a large urban city.

alovelystateofmind said...

love this series! so much to learn from everyone around the world!

cloudgathererholdmedown said...

ditto, I am not a mother either, but I am finding this series of interviews fascinating and enlightening in broadening perspectives and opening a small door onto the lives of women in various cultures.

Mariah said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mariah said...

I am planning on moving to Belgium and even though I do not have any kids I will most likely be there when I do and I would LOVE a post about expat mothers in Belgium!

Trish said...

This is such an interesting series. Thanks so much for running it.

MJ said...

Awesome series so far. What other countries will you be featuring? I would love to see something about parenting in poorer countries or on a tropical island. Japan and Norway are both very wealthy countries, so I guess it's not surprising that the living is easy :).

Laney said...

I can't get enough of these posts! As a mama of almost two kids, it really puts my life in perspective with my struggles and successes. I could read a book of these essays!

MJ said...

Joanna, in future entries for this series could you ask your interviewees more about baby/pregnancy preparations? My Japanese friends have told me that baby showers are taboo and that traditionally the mother will sew her baby's first outfit. Also, mothers stay in the hospital for two weeks after childbirth and it's like a hotel experience. I would love to know more about that, as I think that Americans are so "stuff" focused and seem to need to have everything lined up prior to baby's arrival (crib, basinette, etc...the exploding baby registries!)...I just don't think this exists in other countries.

Happily CF said...

I find this interesting and I'm not even a parent (nor do I plan to become one.) I am interested in the expat life so I am always interested in how people settle into their new lives, and how they compare to their lives in the US.

However, I think it's a stretch to say that this post has "10 surprising things about parenting in Japan." We're getting the affluent expat take on it, which I think in many ways is different from how a native might describe it. It's also about parenting in the countryside, which I doubt is representative of parenting in the entire country. I wonder how parenthood in Tokyo might differ. And, we're also having it contrasted to hipster parenting in Brooklyn, which in some ways is quite unlike parenting in other areas of the US. You could probably do a series in which hipster moms from Brooklyn are plopped down in some rural Heartland location, and find similar "revelations."

To MJ, above, I assure you the pre-baby focus on "stuff" definitely does exist in many countries outside the US.

kv barn said...

i've been living in the czech republic for the past 18 yrs (was born here but raised in the US(4-18yrs)), and i see the large differences of raising kids in both countries (i have 2 small boys)! it's very interesting to read about other places in the world - great series :)!

coco said...

What an awesome series! I missed the other posts so I'm very excited to go back and read them.

Thanks for posting!

Alice said...

I'm fascinated by this series.. I can't wait for more!! I also like your choice to choose women from relatively similar backgrounds because it helps to have some (loose) standard that ties the viewpoints.

rupertpie said...

this was a great read. thanks so much for this series! i look forward to every post!

anne said...

i love how the kids are wearing little scarves on their heads as they prepare their snacks. very sanitary! so cute!

Unknown said...

Fantastic article as someone who just hit her twenties its so wonderful to see what its like to raise children in different countries. I love hearing about new cultures and how it compares to mine. Its so wonderful. It also gives me an idea of where I would like to raise my children someday :) (When Im done with school )

sidenote: can someone please tell me where she got those boots in the first pic??

thanks <3

anfonsec@student.uiwtx.edu

Linda said...

Men don't know how to cook and make a mess! so said women want to do it by themselves(^o^)v quickly.
love ur blog d=(^o^)=b

Unknown said...

Didn't have time to read all the comments, so I'll add this knowing it may have been mentioned already:

In Japan, the reason it seems to Yoko that food isn't labeled is because there is no organic food where she is. Japanese produce is, as a rule, grown with heavy fertilizer and pesticide/herbicide use. No need to label when farming practices are almost universally the same. The exception is usually organic-only supermarkets which can only be found in population centers, and direct marketed produce by organic farmers. Also, sometimes local farmer coops sell produce directly that has *less* chemical use involved, and in my area, they have a special local label for that.

The main way to get organic produce in the country-side is to grow it yourself. There is usually a great deal of support for growing at home in rural areas, and many chemical using farmers use as little chemical input as possible to grow the small portion of food they consume themselves, so they are usually aware with some organic methods. However, a warning, one shouldn't just suggest them to grow only organic because non-organic is "bad", because their livelihoods depend on that chemical use and complaining about it is often seen as snobbish.

The second way is to look around the community. There are usually a few small scale organic farmers, typically immigrants to the area, who grow organically and will be willing to sell some produce. My town has a community of immigrants (Japanese from other parts of Japan) who buy organic dried goods in bulk and hold a monthly market, to which often local organic sellers show up.

The third other way, which seems counter intuitive living in the country-side, is to order online.

KahyZen said...

I love these series!!! I am a Nigerian mom who has been living in the US for the past 10 years and I struggle with being able to strike a balance with my cultural differences. I love it!!! I anxiously await the next Monday's post. Thanks Jo!!!

http://kahyzen.blogspot.com

La Papeleria Antigua said...

Love this series! We moved from Boston to Japan last year, I really love living in Japan. I have a one year old baby girl. Our doctor is already asking us what kind of school she is going to attend! The food is so healthy, and the transportation is great. My only complaint about Japan is that whenever I tell people I'm American they always say "but where are you from originally" i feel like Japanese people have this picture of Americans being all blonde and blue eyed. I am Salvadorian American so I guess it throws them off. But yes I get the sense it's hard to fit in. However it's a great country and I love living here. Can't wait for the next post!!

Champagne Sunday said...

Love this series! It's relevant too me in so many ways. I'm a first time mom, I'm American with Asian immigrant parents, so I have my own cross cultural issues just with that. My husband and I also are planning to move and raise our family to (rural) Italy or France so the insight on expat parenting is fascinating. I'm surprised that it seems must people aren't aware of the mostly patriarchal society in Japan. Modernity and technological advancement have nothing to do with culture. Even here in the US, men and women tend to separate in social occasions especially at family gatherings. Case in point, on our summer vaca, I found that I was stuck with the women and kids, as the men drank and fished, which I found annoying because I wanted to be kid free and relaxing and drinking myself. So we're not as equal as we think we are.

I'm hungrily waiting for your next installments. This is your best series yet!

Cheers! From,
www.champagnesundayliving.com

Sandra Lee said...

I'm loving this series. As a daughter who was raised by a proud Mexican mother and Italian father in the US, it was tough for us to find a balance between the cultures. I'm looking forward to reading more of these!
www.notesfromtheslife.com

RoOHOohoO said...

So interesting. Although i can't imagine for myself to want to give up individuality, the safety and reduction of worry about school/healthcare etc. sounds very very appealing. Thank you so much for the post Joanna!! Can't wait to learn more about other cultures!!

Leah said...

I loved reading this! Sounds like a really great place to raise a family.

Hena Tayeb said...

It sounds so similar to any other Asian culture. Pakistan and India are the same way.. while there is the 10% where men are helping around the house and women do have jobs and spouse do not live separate lives. That is not the majority and people are still quite happy.

Rebecca said...

This is one of my favorite series you're doing. I also enjoy reading about you and biking! Great blog, Joanna!

britniebanks.com said...

Thank you for doing this series! My boyfriend and I always read it together and discuss the differences even without having the kids. Bringing different cultures into our lives is always important to us, and having the different tools to come back to when we do decide to have children is worth millions!

Thank you!

www.britniebanks.com/blog

Jewell said...

I didn't read through all of the comments, but I just wanted to say that I LOVE this series. We are an American couple and lived in Japan for the last 4 years. I 100% relate and agree to everything that Yoko writes about, and she explains it so well. We had our daughter in a rural town as well, and after moving to Tokyo to advance our careers, we put her in a "working mom" school that was amazing (and cheap!) I remember having to prove my job, too. We've only been back for 7 months, but I am already missing our great life there. The pressure of family and putting down roots finally brought us home to the USA, but I will never regret starting my daughter's life in Japan! She has blonde hair and blue eyes, but her first language was Japanese. When she see's a Japanese girl on TV or in a book, she says "That's Ella!" She is only 3 and already embraces other cultures. Yay!!!

Megan said...



I lost my 15 years relationship during December. My husband left me with so many pains and since then i have been heart broken and shattered. I have contact 7spell casters and 7 of them has rip me off my money without no result. I have Emailed so many sites online looking for a good spell caster untill i was directed by a 20 years old boy to wiseindividualspell@gmail.com: wiseindividualspell@gmail.com At first i never believed him because he was requesting for some amount of money to buy items to cast the spell, it took him 4 weeks to convince me and something occur to my mind and i said let me give him a trial. I was very shocked when Nichasin called four days after i sent Dr.Zack Balo the items money. He apologies for all he has done wrong and i am very happy that we are together today now because he proposed to marry me. I will advise you contact wiseindividualspell@gmail.com because he has done wonders in my life and i believe he can help you out in any problem.

stew said...

Great article, but as people have said, its a pity its comparing bohemian USA with rural Japan and not more representative examples of the respective cultures.

The information about hoikuen vs. yochien in Japan strikes me as perhaps not so representative also as all the "full-time mothers" Yoko knows would not get their kids into the "working mom's daycare" if it were thus restricted. It depends on the area but daycare that is limited to working mother's only and hard to get into will mostly be for "mimanji" (3s and under). Once kids hit 4, pretty much anyone can get into hoikuen if places are available, which is an almost cert in rural Japan. Public facilities like daycare are classic pork barrel construction projects beloved of inaka politicians. Even very small communities will have plenty.

We have three kids in the Japanese countryside. I love to see my daughter walk to school and am happy with the general discipline and manners taught at school. She's only second grade, so lessons are still fun and free of the top-down rote learning that I hear is served up to older children. However I've been disappointed in that my daughter's school has a constant stream of open days and events and volunteer jobs that parents are supposed to come in for, often during office hours. I would say there is one every two weeks on average, without even being on the PTA! Ours is a traditional rural school and I'd imagine things are better in the city, but there is no way a mother of a child at my daughter's school could work a full-time professional job. You'd be constantly taking time off.

Elizabeth said...

wow! the place to be! fantastic!
I could say I feel the same about London as the author about New York. i wish when we have children to move to such place as japan! :)

Doraemon said...

What a great story! I would love to live in Japan! Too much pressure here in the USA! Your family is so lucky!

Doraemon said...

What a great story! I would love to live in Japan! Too much pressure here in the USA! Your family is so lucky!

Regi:Create said...

Wow. I can so relate to many of her experiences, but some of mine were very different as well. My son (now 4) was born in Japan and my daughter attended a Japanese yochien as well. But I did see breastfeeding... especially at PTA events. It was my first exposure to nursing beyond a year in fact. My experience in Japan caused me to awaken from my American cultural auto-pilot way of parenting and adopt a more open minded attitude.

Hannah Guillory said...

Transitioning to any culture can be difficult for anybody. However, having lived in various countries around the world, I would say that the benefits far outweigh the inconveniences. It all has to do with how open-minded you're willing to be about the cultural differences and challenges.

Sarah O. said...

I'm loving this series but Yoko was the first mom I've read who didn't seem happy in her destination. Is it just me?

Noriko Murphy said...

Not only Japanese women but also Asians women are typically known to be a “good wife”, which mean that they listen to their husbands well and make sure that husbands are comfortable at home and do not ask much to help the household cores. However, it is not actually the case in a lot of Japanese wife and husband relationship. Japanese wife may be controlling their husbands most of the time and have more power than their Japanese husbands

- See more at: Japanese wife always treat a husband well…may not be actually true and may be a totally wrong!

Lily said...

I totally love this series! Will you do one of switzerland?

Emily said...

Hi Jo,

Longtime reader of your blog, and loving this series. I'm currently living in Japan, and was just reading an article that sounded very familiar... and then I wondered if someone had lifted the content from this directly?

http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/japanese-mother-compares-child-rearing-techniques-in-u-s-and-japan

This article on Japan Today is an English summary of an article posted on a Japanese website called Madame Riri:
http://www.madameriri.com/2013/08/29/%E5%85%83%E3%82%A2%E3%83%A1%E3%83%AA%E3%82%AB%E5%9C%A8%E4%BD%8F%E3%81%AE%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC%E4%BA%BA%E3%83%9E%E3%83%9E%E3%81%8C%E8%AA%9E%E3%82%8B%EF%BC%81%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC%E3%81%AE%E5%AD%90%E8%82%B2/

The name of the woman is the same as the one referenced in your piece... just thought you should know, as it doesn't look like it's crediting you.

Brett Norman said...

This is such a great story. I am currently dating a Japanese girl in my home country and I am terrified of her becoming distant when we marry. She's even visited a fortune teller who told her that would happen. I hope to god that doesn't happen.

Manoj Kumar said...

Very informative and interesting blog! It is such a plausible effort by the author. I found Japanese Language Courses really helpful for those who are about to start their career. For details you can contact NIHONKAI, a Japanese language institute at www.nihonkaijapan.com

rose said...

My name is Mr frank, my wife was having affair with a senior secretary in her office. I love this woman so much that i would not want to share her with any body. i told her to retire from the job and i would take care of all her needs but she would take it because she is been embraced by everybody in her office, this normally leads to quarrel every-time. i tried all i can to please her and she will promise to be good , some days later she will turn back to her normal way. i was nearly loosing out, i could not focus in my job, my whole life was full of sorrow and i was thinking i should kill the other man my self and put an end to all this until i saw a testimony from a blog on how DR AISABU could cast a love spell to bring my lovers back no matter what is behind the disappointment. so i decided to write him via email. aisabulovespell@gmail.com and now all my wishes are exactly as i wanted. She told me everything that has happened secretly in the past and i forgave her as DR AISABU instructed me to and she loves me and care for me as i ever wanted. i know there are many spells that do not work but i want to assure all you out there no matter what you have been trough to have faith and believe that this is the final solution to your problem. Even if my job is taking most of my time, the little free time i have, i will share the good news to everyone in the world because i know that with love brings happiness and hope for a long life.


CINDY KYLIE said...

HELLO I just wanted to say thank you so much for doing this for me and many others. At the beginning of the break up I felt like I would never love again and that my life has ended. Thanks to all your advice, I now have the courage to face every new day. My heart has healed tremendously and I feel like I can now really move on. If it wasn’t for your words then I would probably still be in that dark place of my life. Thank you, thank you!”drlawrencespelltemple@hotmail. com

speck anita said...


Greetings to every one that is reading this testimony.My husband breakup with me 2 months ago after (10) years of marriage just because he met another woman in his working place and he left me and the kid to suffer. one day when i was reading through the web for help, i saw a post on how this spell caster Dr Trust on this email Ultimatespellcast@gmail.com@gmail.com,on how he have help a woman to get back her husband and i gave him a reply and explain my problems to him to his email and he cast a love spell for me which i use to get my husband back from the wicked woman who took him away from me and after 3 days my husband come back to me.I believed him and today i am glad to let you all know that this spell caster have the power to bring lovers back. because i am now happy with my husband. Thanks for Dr. Trust. His email: Ultimatespellcast@gmail.com or Ultimatepsellcast@yahoo.com

maria cooker said...

This is my testimony about the good work of a man who helped me....My name is maria cooker and I base in London...�My life is back!!! After 8 years of marriage, my husband left me and left me with our three kids. I felt like my life was about to end, and was falling apart. Thanks to a spell caster called papa ork who i met online. On one faithful day, as I was browsing through the internet, I was searching for a good spell caster that can solve my problems. I came across series of testimonies about this particular spell caster. Some people testified that he brought their Ex lover back, some testified that he restores womb, some testified that he can cast a spell to stop divorce and so on. There was one particular testimony I saw, it was about a woman called grace,she testified about how papa ork brought back her Ex lover in less than 72 hours and at the end of her testimony she drop papa ork e-mail address. After reading all these,I decided to give papa a try. I contacted him via email and explained my problem to him. In just 3 days, my husband came back to me. We solved our issues, and we are even happier than before. papa ork is really a talented and gifted man and i will not to stop publishing him because he is a wonderful man...If you have a problem and you are looking for a real and genuine spell caster to solve that problem for you. Try the great papa ork today, he might be the answer to your problem. Here's his contact: orkstarspell@gmail.com Thank you great ork. Contact him for the following:

(1)If you want your ex back.
(2) if you always have bad dreams.
(3)You want to be promoted in your office.
(4)You want women/men to run after you.
(5)If you want a child.
(6)[You want to be rich.
(7)You want to tie your husband/wife to be yours forever.
(8)If you need financial assistance.
(9)Herbal care
10)Help bringing people out of prison
11)Hiv cure.

Contact him today on:
orkstarspell@gmail.com

eva said...

yoko, i love your black coat on the first picture.would you please share where it is from? thanksa million!

Guest said...

"Never in my life have I seen magic work so fast. I ordered a love spells from drstanleyspelltemple@hotmail.com because my man was acting like he didn't want to be with me anymore and spending less time with me before we broke up and i ask Dr. Stanley to cast a love spell on him to make him love me again and come back to me which he did and in the next 24hours after the spell was cast my man came to my house to beg for forgiveness and ask me to accept him back. Thank you Dr. for your help...Sherrie

DRLOVESPELL said...

HOW TO GET YOUR EX BACK

I saw him while walking my dog and fell in love with him instantly. I loved him since always He loved me back. We are a very good looking couple and everybody comment good about us , We share so much and he makes me laugh a lot. It all happened fast and We started living together 2 weeks after meeting and 6 months later we moved to Europe together. We were obsessed with each other, I was planning to move to Europe when we met, he followed me. He was unhappy with his life and I inspired him to change it. Now we are both here but our relationship deteriorated I was constantly afraid of all and everything. I was so scared of loosing him that I would break up with him constantly. He tried his best to keep things together but he also has a character that can be explosive and I am sensible… But we love each much. After another fight he had enough and packed his things and left, Its been 4 months now. because of our argument and fighting I have been studding physiology and everything that has to do with how to have a good relationship.

Now I understand it all, all our mistakes. I made a list of all the things I was sorry for and read it to him, he cried and so did I. But he was full of rage and treated me badly after all i did , don't know he was dating a lady close to where he work then one night i went through his phone and saw a lot of text message they have exchange together ,i was so upset and mad when i read all there text message I could not take it anymore and we finally break up , He lives in another apartment now, we are still in the same city for a months now no contact with each other and i was thinking so much about him until a friend tell me about DR Love that he has help him before to get his love back between 48 hrs drlovespellcastersolution@gmail.com , Tel+2348038096203 then i email Dr Love and he told me there was a demon that was on me that is causing my relationship problem , i was so scared to hear that because i never had that before but i know something is going on with me and i told Dr Love to help . he promise me my boyfriend will come back after we remove the demon so i give him trust and believe tell him go ahead then after 38 hrs i saw my boyfriend knocking my door with a rose flower on is hands,this is the story of my love .

Thank you Dr Love solution.

Juliana from Australia

rohan jha said...

So interesting post!!!! I fond of how traditional and old school life is in Japan. . I found Japanese Language Course really helpful for those who are planning to visit Japan

Michelle Damsel said...


I am michelle from hawaii usa my husband and i have been looking for a child after our marriage for 3years and we have done several things but to no avail, but husband and i did not relent, we continue to find result until we met this spell caster online and we explained our situation to him and he told us that he will cast a fertility spell for me and my husband and he told us what is required of it. so we gave the spell caster our information and he told us to wait for two days before we begin to see result. me and my husband made love again, and after two weeks i went to the hospital and i was confirm positive. so i am very happy and that at last i can now have my own baby. in case you need his help, meet him on........ fertilitytemple@yahoo.com

JULIANNA4 said...


A SOLUTION ON HOW TO GET MY HUSBAND BACK FROM CHEATING

http://abuluspiritualtempleofsolution.blogspot.com/

HI My Name is Jennifer , I wish to share my testimonies with the general public about what this man called dr ABULU of( abuluspiritualtemple@yahoo.com has just done for me , this man has just brought back my lost family to me with his great spell, I was married to this man called James we were together for a long time and we loved our self’s but when I was unable to give he a child for 2 years he left me and told me he can’t continue anymore then I was now looking for ways to get he back until a friend of mine told me about this man and gave his contact email abuluspiritualtemple@yahoo.com) then you wont believe this when I contacted this man on my problems he prepared this spell cast and bring my lost husband back and after a month I miss my month and go for a test and the result stated am pregnant am happy today am a mother a baby girl, thank you once again the great ABULU for what you have done for me, if you are out there passing through this same kind of problems you can contact he today on his mail (abuluspiritualtemple@yahoo.com or his website, http://abuluspiritualtemple.webs.com and he will also help you as well.

cherry johnson said...

i am Mrs cherry Johnson from CANADA,i want to testify of the good work of DR FRANK in my life,i lost my husband to a prostitute who vow to take him away from me by all means.
i was confused never to know what to do until this faithful day a friend of mine called me that there is a man who can solve my problem immediately,i contacted him and he told me that my husband will come begging on his knees believe it or not on that same day he promise me my husband came to the house after 6months begging me to accept him back,so whatever your situation may look like just email the below address:
BLACKSPIRITSTEMPE@GMAIL.COM



Clo De said...

Hotel murah di Jakarta hanya ada di http://www.emkatupang.com/hotel-murah-di-jakarta/ .

source from google : http://goo.gl/ued2FF

Christina Shiu said...

Beautiful story and photo! I really miss the countryside in Japan. Also… the good food and scenery

The level of trust is amazing in Japan. It is common to see little children as young as 5-yr-old walk home on their own from school, even in a big city like Kyoto.

Christina Shiu said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rosafarrel said...

Thanks for sharing your story. I'm an American living in Japan and I'm pregnant, so it's nice to feel someone who can understand.

Rosafarrel said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Rosafarrel said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
maria hasbarger said...

Thanks to this great man of spirit called Dr Idibia which I don't know how to thank him for the good work he has Done for me and family which I want to share my testimony with to you all so I was married to Hassan and my name is Asia for six years now he left me with two kids with know reason which I don't know what to do.so one day i was in my friends place when I exposed my pain to her about my depression which I have be looking for who to help me out of it then my friend called me closer to her self telling me on how she got this great man of spirit who helped her found her way to get her husband back then I ask of his contact she quickly go and get her computer and gave me his Email ID and his number so,that is how I contacted him for a help. And now am so happy with my family and with a happy home if you are in such pain kindly Via Email {greatidibiaspelltemple30@gmail.com} or call +2348103508204 have faith in him and he will help you
Asia

Ehiaghe spell home said...




















Hello viewers all over the world am fred monica, I want to testify of what ehiaghe do for me. i was having a very notorious and serious sickness called HIV i contacted these infection from my ex husband and was very in lost of hope i never believed i was going to be cured until i meant these great man called ehiaghe who God send to help me cure my sickness . just a few moment with these great man he cured my infection i want you to know that all hope is not lost until every thing is done if you also have these following infections contact these email ehiaghespellhome@gmail.com now.
HIV/aids
typhoid fever
gonorrhea
lancer fever.
epilency.
lung cancer.
and also these man can also help you in giving you a very good help just give him a try and your problems will be solved just a contact with him.once again here is his email ;ehiaghespellhome@gmail.com. all call him +2348104933655 or thanks to ehiaghe Regard. GOOdGLUCK..........











rm said...

am writing this because I want to testify how great Papa ogbefispell@gmail.com is. Everyone needs to know! I am a very satisfied and happy client. I can’t tell how long it’s been since I’ve bought spells online, but none of them had the same results than his. Margaret definitely moved in with me 2 months ago. It was just a few weeks after he cast a love spell for me. If know I should have messaged him before, but I was a bit scared that she could find out about the spell hee did so I removed his email. Anyway, I can tell everyone who are reading this that they are doing the right choice to go with Papa ogbefispell@gmail.com for a spell. It was always great communicate with him and all the services he offer are just excellent.

rm said...

am writing this because I want to testify how great Papa ogbefispell@gmail.com is. Everyone needs to know! I am a very satisfied and happy client. I can’t tell how long it’s been since I’ve bought spells online, but none of them had the same results than his. Margaret definitely moved in with me 2 months ago. It was just a few weeks after he cast a love spell for me. If know I should have messaged him before, but I was a bit scared that she could find out about the spell hee did so I removed his email. Anyway, I can tell everyone who are reading this that they are doing the right choice to go with Papa ogbefispell@gmail.com for a spell. It was always great communicate with him and all the services he offer are just excellent.

Site design by Apartment One
Federated Media Publishing - Style